Archive for August, 2011

Teach Your Child to Write Creative Sentences

Posted in how to teach kids to write creative sentences, how to teach kids to write sentences, teaching children to write a good sentence | Comments Off on Teach Your Child to Write Creative Sentences

 

Teach children how to write creative, fantastic sentences. 

We have so many children

who cannot construct

a simple sentence

let alone

write an interesting one.

For just $3.97,

you can teach your child

how to write grammatically correct,

creative sentences

loaded with descriptive words. 

 *Spend just 20 minutes a day, three times a week,

teaching that instruction.

  

Teaching Children to Write Creative Sentences 

is a fantastic,

downloadable,

printable teacher resource

for just $3.97

that makes it so easy to see:

1)The preliminary skills for children to gain prior to writing sentences.            

2) How to break down creative sentence construction using a blackboard and a teacher who always begins with the verb.

With this consistent teaching strategy, children can gain the solid skills — by the end of 4th grade to construct good, consistent, detailed sentencesthat use expressive modifiers and answer important questions like: Who? What? Where? When? What kind? How?

Gaining the skill to write sentences doesn’t happen overnight.  It is not a skill that children naturally acquire as they grow older.  Rather, learning to write good, creative sentences is a skill that is learned layer upon layer. 

Learning to write great sentences is really a simple skill to acquire if it’s a) taught in a fun, creative way, b) given within the framework of a step-by-step plan of action that involves student or group participation, and c) presented consistently with a blackboard and a teacher who always begins with the verb. 

Yet, today, we have so many children who cannot construct a simple sentence let alone write an interesting sentence.  Oh, yes, we’ve given our students worksheet after worksheet where they’ve been required to locate the verb and/or the subject, where they’ve been required to complete the sentence or to sequence a list of sentences.  We’ve given them story starters and asked them to write their own stories.  However, many of us have missed the boat in teaching them exactly how to create a good, solid, creative, descriptive sentence.  Sadly, this is why so many of our students still cannot construct a good, interesting, readable sentence by the time they enter their first rhetoric class in college.

Teaching Children to Write Creative Sentences demonstrates a method that if presented consistently by an excited, fun-loving teacher, will teach kids to easily compose good, creative, descriptive, easy-to-read sentences.

Check it out. 

Teaching Children to Write Creative Sentences a printable download  for just $3.97.

Sincerely,

Carol Kay, President

Candy 4WAY Phonics

www.candy4wayphonics.com

(Note – Teaching Children to Write Creative Sentences is a parent/teacher resource from the makers of Candy 4WAY Phonics.) 

Knowing the Spelling Patterns works!

Posted in multisensory spelling phonics flashcards, phonics cards, phonics wall cards printable, Teach Your Child to Spell, the spelling patterns | Comments Off on Knowing the Spelling Patterns works!

 

 

Teach your child the spelling patterns if you want him/her to learn to spell phonetically.

Now you can purchase 65 Large, Multisensory Phonics Flashcards/Wall Cards – all the phonograms and letters and blends along with all the possible spellings for each phonogram in printable/flashcard form for just $6.97.  Affordable?  It sure is! What’s more, you can print these on cardstock or print on regular copy paper and laminate as many times as you need throughout your teaching years. 

It’s so important to teach children to correctly spell using spelling patterns for the sounds they hear in word.  These 65 LARGE Colored Multisensory Flashcards/Wall Cards (available only from Candy 4WAY Phonics)are designed to help children learn all of the alphabet letter sounds, the short and long vowel sounds, and those 114 most common but tricky phonogram sounds. When printed, these Multisensory Flashcards/Wall Cards display Multisensory COLORED pictures as well as many catchy rhymes and phrases.

These are LARGE, 8 1/2 inch by 11 inch Multisensory COLORED Flashcard/Wall Cards in PDF Printable format – ready for you to print on paper or cardstock.

Each LARGE Colored Multisensory Flashcard/Wall Card picture appeals not only to a child’s sight, but also to his sense of touch, his appeal to colors, his sense of emotion, and his sense of hearing.

This is a great resource to help young children as young as preschool with phonemic awareness all the way up to older children who struggle in reading and need to learn not only the phonograms, but all the possible spellings for the phonogram sounds.

These 65 LARGE Colored Multisensory Flashcards/Wall Cards are also the perfect decor to surround a teacher’s classroom walls or a homeschooler’s education room.

Each of these Multisensory Flashcards/Wall Cards represents either one of the 26 alphabet letters sounds, one of the short or long vowel sounds, or one sound from the 114 most common but tricky phonograms.

For example, a freezing bear inside of an ice cube represents the sound of the phonogram br.

A hooting owl represents the sounds of long u, long oo, u_e, ue, ui, ew, ough.

Each of the long vowel sound Flashcards/Wall Cards displays all the possible spellings for each long vowel sound. For example, did you know that the sound of Long A can be spelled 10 different ways?

 

If you’ve ever viewed the television special about Marva Collins, you’ll remember those vintage multisensory alphabet letter wall cards that surrounded her classroom. Each wall card illustrated one multisensory picture that represented one of the alphabet letter sounds.

The Candy 4WAY Phonics 65 LARGE Colored Multisensory Flashcards/Wall Cards have been patterned after those vintage wall cards, except that each Candy Multisensory Wall Card has been updated with this generation’s styles.

Multisensory training takes advantage of the way our senses–hearing, sight, and touch — reinforce one another as we learn. The combination of listening, looking, and moving presented in these flashcard pictures creates a lasting impression—things connect to each other and letter sounds begin to fit into place in a child’s mind.

Once again, this is a great resource to help young children as young as preschool with phonemic awareness all the way up to older children who struggle in reading and need to learn not only the phonograms, but all the possible spellings for the phonogram sounds.

 

Sincerely,

Carol Kay, President

Candy 4WAY Phonics

www.candy4wayphonics.com

 

Young Children Who Struggle in Reading Soon Become Older Children Who Struggle in Reading!

Posted in children who struggle with reading, how to teach an older child to read, my child can’t read, when kids can’t read | Comments Off on Young Children Who Struggle in Reading Soon Become Older Children Who Struggle in Reading!

 

 The other day

I read a statement 

made by a current

American educator

that talked about today’s classroom methods

for teaching our children

how to read,

and I was just grieved at the absurdity of what it said. 

It indicated that young children

need to begin

their reading education

with a two-step process:

Step 1 – Learn to

sight read whole words

Step 2 – Learn to

break down those whole words

 into smaller segments.

This is absurd

because it’s a backwards way

to learn to read.

 

I printed the statement,

(see below)

and then

I put the words and ideas

that concerned me

in blue letters.

 

 Here’s how the complete statement read:  

“ Phonological processing is one of the earliest requirements for successful reading. This is the understanding of how letters correspond to different sounds in a language, such as, how a ‘d’ sounds like “duh” and “w” sounds like “wuh.” …But this concept can be complicated for little minds to grasp. First, children have to be able to break words down into individual letters, assign the letters to sounds, and blend the sounds together to make a word. Breaking words apart into individual sounds, or phonemes, can be tough. This skill is called decoding, referring to the idea that reading is breaking a “code” of letters and sounds. Kids who have difficulty at this level of reading are often noticed in kindergarten or first grade when these skills are taught.” 

 

Ok, so why does it bother me that this statement claims that children should start their reading education by:

First –  learning to sight read whole words

and

Second – learning to break those whole words apart?

 

I am concerned because a grave number of children who learn to read in this backwards way quickly become struggling readers.  They never learn to sound out words from left to right.

 

Moreover, these young children who struggle in reading soon grow into older children who struggle in reading.    

Let’s examine more closely some of the current classroom ideas shared in the statement (ideas printed in blue) that I truly believe to be backwards methods of reading instruction in order to understand why children should not start their reading education learning to sight read and memorize “whole” words. 

 

The following statements

printed in blue

are the current

educational ideas

that I believe

should concern us:

A)   this concept can be complicated for little minds to grasp. First, children have to be able to break words down into individual letters

Why is this statement incorrect?  Why are little children (“little minds”) required to break apart “whole” words to get to the smaller letters so they can “figure out” the sounds of the letters? This strategy used in American schools across this nation, this strategy of giving beginning readers whole words to memorize and break apart, is completely backwards.  Little children should not start out reading “whole” words.  Instead, little children should first learn the individual letter sounds that make up those whole words. After that, children should learn how to blend those sounds together to form words.  Eventually, they will learn how to  sound out every word on every page they encounter, sounding out each word from left to right.  

 

B)   children have to…assign the letters to sounds

Why is this statement incorrect?  Beginning readers should not be given the task of sight reading big words and then matching the sounds they hear in those big words to the letters that represent those sounds.  This is backwards.  Yet this is what American public schools are doing.  Our educational classroom methods are asking children to sight read big words before they have learned the sounds inside those big word and how to blend those sounds together in order to read those big words.      

When little children are taught to sight read and memorize whole words without first learning to blend together all the letter sounds within those words, they are learning to read through a method called “embedded phonics.”  Embedded phonics is not real phonics, and it is dangerous. Embedded phonics coupled with the sight-reading/guided reading techniques in our schools today is causing enormous numbers of children to “guess” at words.  Click here to read more about the difference between explicit phonics and embedded phonics.    

 

 C)   Breaking words apart into individual sounds, or phonemes, can be tough

 Why is this statement incorrect?  It’s incorrect because it should be tough to break words apart.  Of course, our classrooms have made it tough by teaching our children to sight read and memorize whole words instead of first teaching our children the individual letters and blends inside those words.  It creates quite a problem for a child when he is asked to break apart a “whole” word into its individual letter sounds when he doesn’t know what those letter sounds are or what they sound like.  The task before him quickly becomes nothing but a big guessing game.  Learning to read should not be an overwhelming task.  Learning to read is a step-by-step process of learning letter sounds. learning to blend those sounds together from left to right, so that in time, a child can sound out every word on every page.   

 

D)   reading is breaking a “code” of letters and sounds

Why is this statement incorrect? 

  • Learning to read DOES NOT require children to break a code of letters and sounds.   

  • Learning to read DOES require children to learn the code of letters and sounds. 

  • In other words, children who are still trying to break the code of individual letter sounds within “whole” words are children who have never learned the code of letters and sounds in the first place.

 

E)   Kids who have difficulty at this level of reading are often noticed in kindergarten or first grade when these skills are taught.”

Why does this statement cause me grief?

 It grieves me because most of these kids should not be having difficulties learning to read.   

It grieves me because: 

  • None of those children are acquiring the necessary skills to recognize the sounds represented by individual letters.

 

  • Most of those children will make up the 8 million kids who are going to reach grades 4 through 12 that are still struggling to read.

 

  • Most of those children will make up the 70% of kids who will not be reading at grade level by the time they reach the 8th grade.

 

  • None of those children will have access to the rich morsels of the English language, of their country’s history, of mathematical concepts, of current events, of literature, or of science when they enter the fourth grade that they could have had access to if they’d learned to read correctly when they were little.

 

  • So many of those children are going to mistakenly be labeled with dyslexia and other reading difficulties when, in fact, if they’d learned to sound out words correctly when they were little, they would have never struggled in reading at all. 

 

  

Fortunately, it is NOT TRUE that the older a child is, the more difficult it is to teach him or her to read.

Fortunately, it is NOT TRUE that the window of opportunity to learn to read closes when a child gets older.

Fortunately, it is NOT TRUE that if a child can’t read by the end of third grade, odds are that he or she will never catch up.

Fortunately, it is NOT TRUE that children who have struggled in reading must continue dealing with a low self image. 

Fortunately, it is NOT TRUE that children who have struggled in reading must continue battling with frustration, anger, and defeatism.

 

Children, both young and old,

who are taught to read

with a step-by-step phonics-first curriculum

do not need to face all those struggles!

 

 

Am I saying that many, many children in America

who are struggling in reading

could learn to really and truly read

– that their whole reading “problem”

could disappear completely?  

You bet I am! 

A good many of these children

(and I mean a great many of these children)

who cannot read

can learn how to read every word on every page.

 

They just need to start again with a curriculum that works – a step-by-step, parent/friendly curriculum that teaches them the individual letter sounds, how to blend those letters together, and moves on to teach them, one step at a time, all the rest of the letter blends and phonograms that they will ever need to know to be able to sound out every word on every page.  Older kids and children who cannot read can learn to read.  They can learn to read with speed and fluency.  They can learn to read so that they can begin to understand what they read.   

Check it out:  www.candy4wayphonics.com

Sincerely,

Carol Kay, President

Candy 4WAY Phonics (a company that believes in children)

P.S.  One reason I relentlessly post blogs that correctly describe a workable reading process is because families whose children struggle in reading, or families with parents who have reading difficulties themselves, often do not want to talk about their child’s reading struggles.  It is my hope that by offering the Candy 4WAY Phonics blogs and by making an affordable COMPLETE curriculum available to these families, that they will no longer have a reading problem to talk about.