Archive for the How many children cannot read? Category

Your Child Can Struggle in Reading, but that Does Not Mean He Has a Learning Disability, or a Speech Problem, or Dyslexia, or ADHD or ADD!

Posted in How many children cannot read?, how to teach an older child to read, my child can't read, older children who struggle in reading, teaching older children to read | Comments Off on Your Child Can Struggle in Reading, but that Does Not Mean He Has a Learning Disability, or a Speech Problem, or Dyslexia, or ADHD or ADD!

 

Your Child Can Struggle in Reading, but that Does Not Mean He Has a Learning Disability, or a Speech Problem, or Dyslexia, or ADHD or ADD!

This is because so many American reading problems are a direct result of teachers using the wrong reading method to teach reading!

For example, here are ten strategies provided to teachers for their Guided Reading programs:

1) Provide wait time

2) Give prompts or clues

3) Do a “picture walk” and help children “predict” what might happen in

the story.

4) Give encouragement such as: “Try that again.”

5) Ask questions such as: “Does that make sense?”

6) Ask questions such as: “What part of the word do you know?

7) Ask questions such as: “What does the word start with?”

8) Ask questions such as: “Have you ever seen a word that looks like that?

9) Ask questions such as: “Does the picture on the page give you a clue?

10) Allow everyone to “whisper” the entire book to themselves (use PVC whisper phones to help facilitate)

 

OH, MY GOODNESS! WHERE SHOULD I BEGIN?

 

Whenever I review these types of whole language “learning-to-read strategies,” I get more frustrated than an eBay recipient attempting to open a Priority Mail box where the easy-to-open pull strip has been taped over with layers and layers and layers of heavy-duty, two-inch-wide, clear tape.

 

Just like that Priority Mail box, learning to decode words should not be a tightly closed package children struggle to open.

 

It’s as if we desire to give kids everything they need to learn to read except what they really DO need: a step-by-step, proven, systematic 4WAY Phonics Program.

 

Our children should be able to sound out every word on every page. Learning to read should not be a big mystery box that is difficult to open, but that is exactly what our American public school classrooms have turned reading into.

 

Children should not have to do picture walks, guess at a word from its first letter, try to remember a word that looks like the word they’re presently staring at, or decide if their “guess” is correct depending upon whether a word makes sense in the sentence.

 

Children should be able to begin at the beginning of a word and sound out that word effortlessly, from left to right, all the way through to the end of the word. Children do not need all that other strategic, look-n-say, sight-reading hoopla to “figure out” what a word is. Children simply need step-by-step, easy-to-understand, daily training in systematic phonics.

 

Guessing at words is one aspect of whole language strategy. Whole language proponents (and that’s what guided reading advocates are) also claim that children need to learn to read “for meaning.” Therefore, their whole language methods encourage students to look for meaning in the text through different types of whole-language strategies.

 

What’s wrong with this? The dichotomy is between learning to read vs. reading to learn.

 

Certainly, it’s just common sense that students must learn to read every word on every page before they can learn to read for meaning. You can’t have one without the other, and learning to read always needs to come first.

 

So the question now is, What do we mean by reading?

 

You might say, “Well that’s a silly question.” However, with today’s Guided Reading techniques in full swing inside hundreds of thousands of American classrooms, “What do we mean by reading?” really is the big question.

 

And even though we’ve turned reading into a big question, the answer to learning to read is really an easy answer.

 

Reading is when a child can survive in a fast-paced, high-tech American classroom, look at a page of text, effortlessly sound out every word he encounters, gain a basic understanding of what he has read, be able to accurately draw conclusions from the facts given, and comprehensively make inferences from all the details specified.

 

A child who can read should have the ability to read selected text accurately, smoothly, effortlessly, and with appropriate expression and meaning.

 

The fact is that 28 major countries in the world have a higher literacy rate than the United States. In the United States, the total number of functionally illiterate adults increases by approximately 2.25 million every single year. Even more sad, 76 percent of high school students in Detroit schools flunked out this June while other cities like Chicago, Los Angeles, and Houston produced dropout rates from 50 to 60 percent.

 

The bottom line is this, if we don’t do something to fix the reading rate of American children, then 1.2 million illiterate teens will continue to hit American streets each year.

 

Moms, Dads, your child does not have to join these statistics. For less than $10 you can change the reading path of your child. If you, too, cannot read, you can learn to read every word on every page as you teach your child to do the same.

 

Please check us out – Candy 4WAY Phonics. It’s a simple, affordable program that can change what “reading” is all about.

Sincerely,

Carol Kay, President

Candy 4WAY Phonics

Illiteracy in America! Hello to a Nation Where 7 Million Americans Cannot Read!

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There was once a REAL little girl named Candy who struggled in reading. 

However, Candy CAN read now!  She can read every word on every page!

YOUR CHILD CAN LEARN TO READ, TOO!

Read Candy’s TRUE STORY at:  www.candy4wayphonics.com

It’s Second Semester, and Thousands of Older Children are Still Struggling to Read!

Posted in 2nd grade phonics, ADD, ADD and ADHD, ADHD, adult literacy problems in the united states, affordable homeschool reading program, basic phonics rules, best phonics program, best phonics readers, decodable text, decoding, easiest to use phonics program, easy to teach reading program, English grammar resource, ESL, Essays on Teaching, explicit phonics, homeschool phonics, homeschool phonics curriculum, homeschool phonics program, homeschool reading, Homeschool Reading Curriculum, Homeschool Reading Program, Homeschooling, homeschooling phonics program, Homeschooling Reading Program, homeschooling your preschooler, Homework and Study Skills, How can I tell if my child is getting phonics, how do you teach a child to read?, How many children cannot read?, How to know your child is getting phonics, how to teach a child to read, how to teach an older child to read, Illiteracy in the United States, implicit phonics, inexpensive phonics lessons, inexpensive phonics program, inexpesnive reading program, intensive phonics, K-8 Subject Areas, LD, Learning Disabilities, limiting the number of sight words, look/n/say vs phonics, my child can't read, my child can’t read, my child does not have a learning disability, my child does not have ADD, my child does not have ADHD, my child does not have dyslexia, older children who struggle in reading, Oral Language, Parent Involvement, parents resource for preschool education, phonic, phonics curriculum, phonics for english, Phonics Help for Parents, phonics lesson plans, phonics lessons, phonics program, phonics rules, Phonics vs Look/Say, preschool reading curriculum, public school classroom, reading, Reading Problem in American Schools, reading program, Report Cards, School Improvement, software, Special Education, synthetic phonics, systematic phonics, teacher training in reading, teaching older children their sounds, teaching older children to read, teaching phonics, true child story, true phonics vs look/n/say story, true reading stories, true reading story, true stories about children, words with fun in them | Comments Off on It’s Second Semester, and Thousands of Older Children are Still Struggling to Read!

 

PARENTS,

Teaching your older child to read is NOT difficult! 

 

Your time in teaching, however, must include:

1)  a 20 to 30 minute, step-by-step, reading lesson each day 

2) a proven, affordable systematic 4WAY Phonics program.

Let’s face it, you wouldn’t be reading this page if your older child had learned to read every word on every page, and that is what every parent should desire for their child. Indeed, you might be the only one who really cares that your child is struggling to read, and that’s exactly why you need to know that your older child CAN learn to read every word on every page!

 

Very soon, in these next few months , thousands of American parents will discover that their little third or fourth grade child is struggling to read his school textbooks.

 

It is also quite possible that this is the first time these parents have become aware that their little guy or gal cannot read every word on every page. Sadly, this is because many of these parents have been led to believe that based upon a normal bell curve, their child has been doing “just fine” in reading.

 

The only problem is, NOW, these young ones are in the third or fourth grade, they are expected to read lessons from higher level textbooks and answer comprehension questions, and they are struggling to read every word on the page and to make total sense of the facts given in each paragraph.

 

You see, it’s a fact that most of our students today are learning to read using Look/n/Say, Whole Word methods, methods that are mixed with just enough phonics to make everyone believe that our students are learning to decode all the words on the page.

 

Unfortunately, what little phonics that has been presented in so many of our classrooms has given way whole-heartedly to the memorization of Whole Words printed on Word Walls and contained on the monotonous pages of easy-to-read I Can Read Books. Moms, Dads, children cannot continue to memorize or guess every whole word on the page after they’ve reached the higher grades. It just isn’t possible!

 

According to Sebastian Wren, a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Texas, a competent reader (and that would be a reader who has learned to decode words by sounding them out from left to right) has a reading vocabulary of around 50,000 words.

 

However, Dr. Wren goes on to tell us that children who have been taught to read using Look/n/Say, Whole Word methods are only capable of memorizing a maximum of 5,000 words. According to Rudolph Flesch, author of Why Johnny Can’t Read, that maximum number is more in the neighborhood of 2,000 words.

 

Many educators today are completely unaware of the fact that the difference between a sight-reader and an intensive 4WAY Phonics reader can be seen by the comparison of how many words each type of reader can decode at the end of his/her fourth grade school year

 

By the end of third grade, the sight reader will be able to read 1,216 words and by the end of fourth grade, 1,554 words.  In comparison, by the end of third grade, the intensive 4WAY Phonics reader will be able to read an estimated 30,000 words (approximately the same number of words that are in his spoken vocabulary) and by the end of fourth grade, 40,000 words or higher!

 

Older students struggling to read, students who are victims of Look/n/Say, Whole Word reading techniques where children are asked to memorize numerous whole words from Word Walls and to search for “clues” to “figure out” what a word “might be” are children who, as a result of WRONG reading methods, have lost their self-esteem, have developed a fear of reading, and have experienced far too many situations where reading either silently to themselves or reading aloud in front of others has made them feel “dumb.”

 

Folks, this is an appalling situation!

It shouldn’t be taking place!

Nevertheless, this reading crisis for so many of our older children is happening!

 

THE GOOD NEWS, however, is: 

a) Parents can change these outcomes for their own child.

b) Parents can teach their own children to read every word on every page, and for less than $10.

c) Parents can raise their child’s self-esteem from bad to great.

d) Parents can take away their older child’s fear of reading.

 

Bruce Price, a novelist, author, and English Literature Honors Graduate from Princeton University sums up this dreadful whole-word reading process when he states:

“For the victims of Whole Word, every word is just a pile of sticks, a random assortment of scratches going in different directions…Similarly, a person literate in English knows that “busy” is a word but “bsuy” is probably a typo. A Whole Word victim sees nothing odd about “bsuy.”

 

Bruce goes on to explain that Whole Word victims are taught to memorize words in the same way that we memorize phone number. He describes the struggle that whole-word readers experience when they often reverse letters; as a result, they are often and regrettably mislabeled as dyslexic. When speaking about whole-word learners he states:

“There’s nothing odd about 1587649 compared to 1857649. Reversals are common when humans try to memorize either Whole Numbers or Whole Words. How many people could memorize even 100 phone numbers, never mind 500? In reading, such reversals are called dyslexia, an illusory problem created by an illusory pedagogy because of the “guessing and memorization techniques” they’ve been taught in their prior reading times.”

 

Parents, here are two more pieces of great news:

1) Your older child can learn to read every word on every page!

2) It will cost you less than $10 plus your time of just 20 to 30 minutes a day.

Click here to read about TEN STEPS you can take to insure that your child, no matter how old he/she is, can learn to read every word on every page.

Sincerely,
Carol Kay, President
Candy 4WAY Phonics
www.candy4wayphonics.com