Archive for the phonics rules Category

Basic Phonics Rules – Looking for the Top 10 Phonics Rules? Well, here’s the Top 20 Phonics Rules!

Posted in Free Phonics Rules, List of Phonics Rules, Phonics Basics, phonics rules, teaching phonics, Teaching Phonics Rules | Comments Off on Basic Phonics Rules – Looking for the Top 10 Phonics Rules? Well, here’s the Top 20 Phonics Rules!

Top 20 Basic Phonics Rules

1.  Every word should be approached from the farthest left side of the word not from the middle of the word or from the end of the word.

2. Every word should be sounded out beginning from the left end of the word and sounded all the way through the word to the right end of the word.

3. Every word must include at least one vowel.  The vowels are: a, e, I, o, u, and sometimes y. (Examples of words where y acts as the vowel are: my, fly)

4. When a word has only one vowel and more than two letters, the vowel is short.  (Examples: mat, bend, rip, dock, fast)

5. When a word ends with a silent “e,” the vowel that comes before the silent “e” will be long. (Examples:  make, Pete, Mike, note, rule)

6. When a syllable has 2 vowels together, the first vowel is usually long and the second vowel is silent. (Examples:  train, beat, boat, true)  NOTE: Diphthongs do not follow this rule.  Click here to see more about “diphthongs.”

7. When the letter “u” says its long sound, it can either say “you” as in “mule” or “oo” as in rule.

8. The letter “q” always has to be accompanied with the letter “u.” (Examples:  quack, quake, quick)

9. When two consonants appear together and can be blended together, they are called a digraph.  (Examples:  train, brick, pray) Note:  A trigraph is a phoneme which consists of three consonant letters that can be blended. However, many people will simply use the term ‘digraph’ when speaking about a trigraph.  (Examples:  “scr” in scrape or “str” in stream)

10. When 2 consonants join together and form one new sound, they are called “consonant digraphs.”  A “consonant digraph” is counted in phonics as just representing just one sound.  (Examples:  chain, thimble, phone, whale, ship)

11. The letter “wa” – when the letter “a” is NOT long, it can either say “wa” as in “water” or “wa” as in “wag.”

12. When the letter “w” comes before “or“, the “or” says “r-r-r.” (Examples:  word, work, worth)  Note – an exception to this rule is the word “sword” where the letter “w” is silent.)

13. When the letter “g” is followed by an “e, i, or y,” it usually says its soft sound of “j.”  (Examples:  gem, gym, giant)

14. When the letter “c” is followed by an “e, i, or y,” it usually says its soft sound of “s.” (Examples:  cent, city, center)

15. When a word contains only two or three letters and the last letter is a vowel, the vowel is often long.  (Examples:  be, she, me)  Note:  An exception to this rule would be the words “do” and “to.”

16. Often a vowel will say the schwa sound.  The schwa sound is when a vowel is pronounced “uh” instead of with its short sound.  (Examples:  Letter “o” says “uh” in mo/ther; Letter “o” says “uh” in sel/dom; the first  “o” says “uh” in oc/ca/sion)

17. When a syllable only has one vowel and that vowel is the last letter in the syllable, that vowel is usually long. (Examples:  o/pen,   u/nite,   la/ter,   lo/cate) Note: An exception to this rule would be a word like mo/ther where the vowel says the schwa sound of  “uh.”

18. Often the letter “a” says the schwa sound of “uh.”  (Examples:  a/head,   ba/na/na,   a/lert,   Chi/na.)

19. When a vowel appears together with the letter “r” its sound changes into an r controlled” vowel.  (Examples:  bark, fork, worth, birth)

20.The letter combinations of “ur,” “ir,” “ar,” “or,” and “er,” often say the “r-r-r” sound, especially if they appear at the end of word.  (Examples: nurse, bird, verse, dollar, director, rather, doctor)

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These “Top 20 Phonics Rules” have been supplied by Carol Kay, President of Candy 4WAY Phonics

For those looking for a COMPLETE and affordable Phonics First Curriculum, the Candy 4WAY Phonics Program sells for just $9.97 

Candy 4WAY Phonics is a step-by-step, daily lesson systematic phonics curriculum that incorporates all of the above phonics rules.  This easy-to-use, fun phonics curriculum includes: 

* 100 Daily, Step-by-step Systematic Phonics Lessons

* 20 Sequenced, leveled Phonics Readers,

* Lifetime Rhyming Phonics Charts

* Rhyming Phonics Flashcards

* Multisensory Helps

* Built-in Spelling Rules

* Continuous Phonics Drill and Review

* FREE Email Coaching.

 

Candy 4WAY Phonics is a systematic phonics first program based upon the TRUE STORY of a little girl named Candy who learned to read in the 1950’s. Little Candy couldn’t read; then she could — thanks to Systematic 4WAY Phonics!

What is Phonics? Are there Basic Phonics Rules? Here’s an Article on Phonics.

Posted in basic phonics rules, phonics rules | Comments Off on What is Phonics? Are there Basic Phonics Rules? Here’s an Article on Phonics.

 

DEAR MOMS AND DADS,

Here is an Article on Phonics Instruction.

 

 

This article will answer questions like: 

What is Phonics? 
and 
Are there basic rules for Phonics?
and
Can children who struggle in reading learn to read correctly with phonics?

 

 

A good article often begins with a STORY THAT’S TRUE.

 

 

So let’s begin with the TRUE STORY of:
Candy, the Little Girl Who Couldn’t Read! 

 

In the beginning
Candy could not sound out words with
short vowels,
long vowels,
consonants,
consonant blends,
consonant digraphs,
vowel digraphs,
diphthongs,  
and
word families.


 

As a result, Candy couldn’t read:
  words or
 sentences or
 
connective words inside fun, interesting sentences.

 

 
   So, answering questions like:  
What? Where? or Who?    
was impossible for Candy.

 

    In addition, making any inferences in her reading
was just not happening.

 

   And then, one day,
Candy could sound out words with
 
 
short vowels,
long vowels,
consonants,
consonant blends,
consonant digraphs,
vowel digraphs,
diphthongs,  
and
word families.
 
   

 

She could, also, answer questions like:
 
Who? What? When: Where? How?

 

 
She could make
inferences in her reading
and answer questions like:
 
Why?

 

 

However, in order to begin at the beginning,
you’d really need to hear the whole story.
Click here to read Candy’s TRUE STORY.

 

www.candy4wayphonics.com

 

Sounding Out Words vs The Nutcracker Suite!

Posted in How Phonics Works, phonics rules, Why Phonics Works | Comments Off on Sounding Out Words vs The Nutcracker Suite!

 

ANOTHER TRUE STORY

FROM CANDY 4WAY PHONICS!

There’s a reason

why Systematic Phonics Works.  

Here’s a true story to illustrate that reason.

 

Mrs. Woods was a skilled music teacher and, fortunately, she taught elementary music appreciation during a segment of American history when public schools could still afford to teach the subject of music.

 

Traveling from class to class, Mrs. Woods toted music scores, recordings, and lecture notes to each classroom of children, first through the fifth grade. 

 

It was during our fifth grade school year that Mrs. Woods decided that our class needed to become familiar with major classical music selections. 

 

Because she knew that a special Christmas orchestral presentation of The Nutcracker Suite would soon be arriving to our downtown music theater, Mrs. Woods used our classroom time to teach us how to recognize certain movements within The Nutcracker Suite as well as its opening overture and final finish. Our favorite movements were The Russian Dance, The Waltz of the Flowers, and The Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy

 

After Mrs. Woods was positive that our ears were trained to recognize all of the necessary elements of this Tchaikovsky fairy tale ballet, she arranged for our class to attend the professional orchestral presentation of The Nutcracker Suite.  

 

Even though we were only in the fifth grade and even though there was no stage ballet dance performance to keep us entertained, Mrs. Woods knew we would remain entertained all the way from the very beginning to the very end of the performance because we knew the opening, middle,  and closing notes and movements of the ballet and because we knew what to listen for in order to tell when a new movement had arrived.  As a result, we all sat back and thoroughly enjoyed the entire orchestral presentation of this Christmas “Nutcracker” Music Special. 

 

DID YOU KNOW THAT learning how to sound out every word on every page is very much like learning how to recognize all the essentials of a classical music selection?

 

You see, just as a proper classical music curriculum teaches children what to “listen for,” a Systematic 4WAY Phonics reading curriculum teaches children what to “look for.”

 

Just as classical music instruction trains students to recognize beginning, middle and ending movements within an orchestral selection, Systematic 4WAY Phonics instruction trains students to recognize beginning, middle, and ending letter and phonogram sounds within words. 

 

Just as classical music students learn to listen all the way through Tchaikovsky’s fairy tale ballet by studying it’s beginning movements all the way through to its center movements and on through to the end of the ballet, Systematic 4WAY Phonics students learn to read all the way through a word  by blending its beginning sounds all the way through to its center phonograms and on through to the end of the word.

 

Tchaikovsky’s students do not begin in the middle of The Nutcracker Suite, nor do they begin at the end of The Nutcracker Suite.  They begin a symphony by listening to its opening overture.  Systematic 4WAY Phonics students do not begin in the middle of words, nor do they begin at the end of words.; 4WAY Phonics students approach a word by starting with its very beginning letter sound and reading all the way through the word to its very ending letter sound

 

Our fifth grade class learned all about The Nutcracker Suite from beginning to end through daily lessons taking just one step at a time.  We did not go on to one lesson until we had mastered the lesson before. 

 

The Candy 4WAY Phonics Program takes children from age 4 through Grade 4 from beginning to end through the 4WAY Phonics step by step lessons.  Students do not go on to one lesson until they have mastered the lesson before.  

 

Mrs. Woods was a skilled music teacher and, fortunately, she taught elementary music classes during a segment of American history when music appreciation classes were an affordable school subject.

 

Homeschooling Moms and Dads are caring teachers who, fortunately, are able to teach a Systematic 4WAY Phonics program during a segment of American history when Candy 4WAY Phonics is FREE OF CHARGE for all parents. 

 

Systematic 4WAY Phonics is that same 4WAY Phonics reading approach that taught a little girl named, Candy, how to sound out every word on every page. 

 

You won’t want to miss reading Candy’s TRUE STORY!

 Sincerely, 
Carol Kay, President
www.Candy 4WAYPhonics