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Help! My Child Can’t Read!

June
30

DID YOU KNOW THAT THERE ARE BASICALLY TWO CATEGORIES OF CHILD READERS IN THIS NATION?

In which of these two categories would you find YOUR child?

CATEGORY ONE – Is your child one of the 7 million children between seven and 11 years of age in this country who is performing below their reading potential?

CATEGORY TWO – If so, then did you know that your child could also be a part of the 95 percent of even the poorest readers THAT COULD LEARN TO READ FAR ABOVE GRADE LEVEL if only given a correct systematic phonics program? 

Unfortunately, many parents suspect that their child is struggling in reading, but they haven’t received enough evidence from a trusted source to verify their suspicions; and that’s sooooo sad, because it leaves their child in Category One above. 

Children who remain in Category One soon decide they neither like nor want to read.  Regrettably, the longer a child remains in Category One, the more likely that he/she will NOT catch up in reading at all; and, in turn, the more likely that child will be to give up in reading altogether. 

THIS IS SO FRUSTRATING TO ME BECAUSE THE ANSWER IS:

SO SIMPLE and

SO AFFORDABLE and

IT REQUIRES LESS THAN 30 MINUTES A DAY TO FIX!

I listened to a little girl read last week. As I listened to her read, I became evermore frustrated, because I really believe that this little girl has all the potential in the world to move from Category One into Category Two! 

She had been given an assignment by her teacher for additional summer reading because this little girl didn’t meet the minimum reading requirements for her public school classroom this year.  She needed to reach at least a reading score of 28 in order to progress into the third grade reading program next year, and she had only reached a reading score of 20.  What those scores mean, I’m not certain, nor do I care.

What I do care about was the note that the teacher sent home to her mother which explained why these two story assignments, plus several more, had been given to this little girl to read over and over again throughout her summer break.  Her teacher had told the parents that their little one needed to learn to read the stories faster and faster so that she could build “fluency.” 

As she read through the first short story, I heard her read words like: “want” and “play” and “Amy” and “outside.” 

As she read through her second story, I heard words like:  “want” and “play” and “Becky” and “outside.” 

I didn’t hear too many other words besides those I just listed.  She read the same words over and over and over and over and over again in both stories. 

Again, she was told to read those two stories over and over again so that she could build “fluency.”

Being the systematic phonics teacher that I am, you can imagine what I was feeling as I listened to her read and as I heard her family cheering her on as she read the words through faster and faster. 

I just CRINGED! 

Fluency is NOT built by reading the same words in a story over and over and over and over and over again and then re-reading those same words faster and faster and faster until you have actually MEMORIZED the whole story. 

Fluency is built by learning to “SOUND OUT” words faster and faster.  This means that each individual letter sound is blended together with the other letters in the word from left to right all the way through the word.  This means that the sounds of certain groups of letters (phonograms) such as “dge,” which says the sound of the letter “j,” have also been learned.

I felt so sorry for this little girl because I knew her memorized-word capacity would sooner or later be reached, and that eventually she would encounter multisyllabic words that she would never be able to sound out.  This is because children who memorize words as wholes are only capable of learning a maximum of about 5,000 words in isolation.

In order to become competent readers with reading vocabularies in the 50,000 to 75,000 range, a reading range necessary to survive in this world, children need to learn to decode words rather than to memorize them.

What is really sad is that this little girl, about to be promoted to the third grade, could have been reading EVERY word on EVERY page, skimming through connective words and complex sentence openers, and progressing into inferential thinking, had she simply gone through a systematic 4WAY Phonics program with her MOM, one-on-one, snuggled together on the couch for only 30 minutes a day.

The Candy 4WAY Phonics program, sold for just $9.97, is a systematic 4WAY Phonics Program that includes EVERYTHING, could have taught this little girl to actually read. 

Let me say it once more:  The Candy 4WAY Phonics program, with its 4WAY Phonics approach, could have taught this little one to actually read if only her parents had known about it, and purchased it, and used it with her.

Please, if your child is in Category One (above), you can move your child to Category Two (above) with a simple $9.97 purchase  plus 30 minutes of your time each day. 
 
Sincerely,
Carol Kay, President
Candy 4WAY Phonics

(a program based upon the TRUE STORY of another little girl named Candy)

 

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As I listened to her read, I became more and more. . .

June
21

 

I listened to a little girl read today. As I listened to her read, I became more and more frustrated! 

She had been given an assignment by her teacher for additional summer reading because this little girl didn’t meet the minimum reading requirements for her public school classroom this year.  She needed to reach at least a reading score of 28 in order to progress into the third grade reading program next year, and she had only reached a reading score of 20.  What those scores mean, I’m not certain, nor do I care.

What I do care about was the note that the teacher sent home to her mother which explained why these two story assignments, plus several more, had been given to this little girl to read over and over again throughout her summer break.  Her teacher had told the parents that their little one needed to learn to read the stories faster and faster so that she could build “fluency.” 

As she read through the first short story, I heard her read words like: “want” and “play” and “Amy” and “outside.” 

As she read through her second story, I heard words like:  “want” and “play” and “Becky” and “outside.” 

I didn’t hear too many other words besides those I just listed.  She read the same words over and over and over and over and over again in both stories. 

Again, she was told to read those two stories over and over again so that she could build “fluency.”

Being the systematic phonics teacher that I am, you can imagine what I was feeling as I listened to her read and as I heard her family cheering her on as she read the words through faster and faster. 

I just CRINGED! 

Fluency is NOT built by reading the same words in a story over and over and over and over and over again and then re-reading those same words faster and faster and faster until you have actually MEMORIZED the whole story. 

Fluency is built by learning to “SOUND OUT” words faster and faster.  This means that each individual letter sound is blended together with the other letters in the word from left to right all the way through the word.  This means that the sounds of certain groups of letters (phonograms) such as “dge,” which says the sound of the letter “j,” have also been learned.

I felt so sorry for this little girl because I knew her memorized-word capacity would sooner or later be reached, and that eventually she would encounter multisyllabic words that she would never be able to sound out.  This is because children who memorize words as wholes are only capable of learning a maximum of about 5,000 words in isolation.

In order to become competent readers with reading vocabularies in the 50,000 to 75,000 range, a reading range necessary to survive in this world, children need to learn to decode words rather than to memorize them.

What is really sad is that this little girl, about to be promoted to the third grade, could have been reading EVERY word on EVERY page, skimming through connective words and complex sentence openers, and progressing into inferential thinking, had she simply gone through a systematic 4WAY Phonics program with her MOM, one-on-one, snuggled together on the couch for only 30 minutes a day.

The Candy 4WAY Phonics program, sold for just $9.97, is a systematic 4WAY Phonics Program that includes everything, could have taught this little girl to actually read. 

Let me say it once more:  The Candy 4WAY Phonics program, with its 4WAY Phonics approach, could have taught this little one to actually read if only her parents had known about it, and purchased it, and used it with her.
 
However, they didn’t, and that genuinely makes me sad!  

Sincerely,
Carol Kay, President
Candy 4WAY Phonics

(a program based upon the TRUE STORY of another little girl named Candy)

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What is Inferential Thinking, and Why is it Important?

June
18

MOMS AND DADS,

Have you ever talked with a child that just seems more capable of drawing conclusions or engaging in more “adult-type” conversation than the average child?  Children that have this capability have received training in how to read, think, and reason.  First, they were taught how to read every word on the page.  Second, they were taught to use more complex connective words.  Third, they were taught how to Make Inferences from what they read. 
 
When a child learns to make inferences, it simply means that he can read a page and draw a particular conclusion of his own, not just from the basic information stated directly in the text, but also from the information that he gathers from clues or hints that he finds inbetween the lines of the text.

Inferential thinking is being able to answer more than just the questions: Who? What? When? Where? and How?  Inferential thinking is when a child learns to  answer these questions: 
 
1) What did you find in the material you read that is relevant to your life, and why is it relevant to your life?
 
2) Can you relate any portion of the material you read to someone or something else in your life? 

3) How do the conclusions you’ve drawn from the material you read relate with the choices you make or will make in the future? 

4) How do the conclusions you’ve drawn from the material you read relate with your personal values?
 
A child will know how to answer those questions after he learns to add together:

a) the actual facts he reads in the text
b) the hints and clues he finds inbetween the lines of the text
c) the conclusions he has previously drawn from his own knowledge, research,  and experiences. 
 
Of course, gaining the proper phonetic skills to actually be able to read every word on every page is the first step to inferential thinking. A child who can sound out all the words in front of him has a much better chance of drawing conclusions about the details given in the reading or of making inferences based upon what he reads inbetween the lines of the reading.  After a child learns to read fluently, he can then learn to proceed beyond the standard facts given on a page and to surmise research-based conclusions of his own. 
 
How do children learn to draw those conclusions?  Children as young as four and five years old can learn to connect bits and pieces of information from the reading of a text from their own stored knowledge, and from their personal experiences through conversations that result from listening to stories and readings that their parents read aloud to them.  
 
Reading aloud to your child will not teach your child how to read. However, reading aloud to your child will enable your child to hear numerous words that are not in his regular vocabulary, to hear ideas and opinions that are not necessarily his own, and to hear written material read through the oral expression of an adult.
 
The biggest advantage to oral reading, though, is the opportunity it affords to you, Moms and Dads, to discuss with your child what he can “imply” or “infer” from the selections that you read out loud. For example, let’s take the opening lines of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. The opening lines of this classic story read as follows: 
 
Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Goldilocks.
She went for a walk in the forest.
Pretty soon, she came upon a house.
She knocked and, when no one answered, she walked right in.
 
Those wonderful opening lines can open up whole channels of conversations between parents and children, conversations that begin with questions such as:
 
1) Why would you think that Goldilocks felt it was safe to walk in the forest alone?

2) How do you think Goldilocks felt about having the name, Goldilocks? 

3) What kinds of names do you want to give to your future children, and why? 

4) Have you ever seen a house hidden away in a forest? 

5) Would you walk into a house if no one answered the door? 
 
Moms and Dads, it is easy to teach our children inferential thinking when we begin reading aloud to them at a young age.  However, be prepared for the inevitable, because children who learn to discuss stories with their parents will eventually desire deeply to read those stories and draw those conclusions independently, by themselves.  Be prepared to make certain that your children receive the proper phonetic training in order to do that. 
 
If a child does not receive the proper phonics training to read for himself, he’ll give up on reading, he’ll give up on books, he’ll give up on his own abilities to draw research-based conclusions, he’ll lose confidence in his own abilities to express himself, he’ll miss out on the adventure of using his thinking skills to help others etc
 
However, children who do receive the proper reading instruction can carry on with inferential thinking.  Inferential thinkers are not just smarter children, but they are wiser children who can:
 
a) Read and gain information.
 
b) Mesh that information together with their own research, knowledge, and experiences, and
 
c) Use that whole package to serve their family, friends, country, and God.  
 
Parents, smarter, wiser children don’t just happen. They are trained.


May God Bless Your Efforts,
Carol Kay, Candy 4WAY Phonics.com
 
 
 

 

 

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